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Most correctly guessed answers

      • What is hypertrophy?
      • Increase in volume of a tissue because of the enlargement of its cells
      • 100.0%
      • What is hyperplasia?
      • Increase in volume of a tissue because of the increase in number of its cells
      • 100.0%
      • According to Willis, a [...] is an abnormal mass of tissue with excessive and uncoordinated growth which continues even when the stimulus is ceased.
      • neoplasm
      • 100.0%
      • In a tumour, the clonal mutant cells are referred to as the [...] in contrast to the stroma.
      • parenchyma
      • 100.0%
      • The supporting connective tissue, blood vessels, and lymphatics of a tumour are called the [...].
      • stroma
      • 100.0%
      • Are benign tumours generally well-differentiated?
      • Yes
      • 100.0%
      • How does prognosis correlate with differentiation of tumour cells?
      • The more anaplastic, the worse the prognosis
      • 100.0%
      • How fast do benign tumours generally grow?
      • Slowly
      • 100.0%
      • How fast do malignant tumours generally grow?
      • Fast
      • 100.0%
      • Are benign tumours generally encapsulated?
      • Yes
      • 100.0%
      • Do benign tumours metastasize?
      • Never
      • 100.0%
      • Do all tumours metastasize in the same way?
      • No
      • 100.0%
      • What is the stroma of a tumour?
      • Its supporting connective tissue
      • 100.0%
      • [...] is the transformation of one differentiated cell type into another differentiated cell type.
      • Metaplasia
      • 100.0%
      • Is the stroma of a tumour made up of clonal tumour cells?
      • No
      • 93.8%
      • A [...] is a tumour which contains ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm.
      • teratoma
      • 93.8%
      • What is the naming convention for malignant tumours of mesenchymal cell origin?
      • Sarcoma
      • 93.8%
      • How do carcinomas first spread through the body?
      • Through lymph vessels
      • 93.8%
      • What is meant by “carcinoma in situ”?
      • Carcinoma is contained by the basement membrane
      • 93.8%
      • Are malignant tumours generally well-differentiated?
      • Not necessarily
      • 93.8%
      • [...] means poorly differentiated.
      • Anaplastic
      • 93.8%
      • How does the growth rate of a tumour correlate with the level of differentiation?
      • Faster growth means less differentiation
      • 93.8%
      • [...] is fibrous tissue formation in response to neoplasm.
      • Desmoplasia
      • 93.8%
      • Is a tumour's grade or stage have the greater prognostic value?
      • Stage
      • 93.8%
      • Are malignant tumours generally encapsulated?
      • Never
      • 93.8%
      • Do malignant tumours metastasize?
      • Sometimes
      • 93.8%
      • [...] is an increase in the number of cells.
      • Hyperplasia
      • 93.8%
      • [...] is a change in cellular phenotype which is commonly neoplastic.
      • Dysplasia
      • 93.8%
      • What is anaplasia?
      • Abnormal undifferentiation of cells
      • 93.8%
      • [...] is abnormal lack of differentiation of cells.
      • Anaplasia
      • 93.8%
      • What is metaplasia?
      • The transformation of one differentiated cell type into another differentiated cell type
      • 87.5%
      • What is neoplasia?
      • Abnormal and uncontrolled clonal proliferation of cells
      • 87.5%
      • [...] is a change in cellular phenotype.
      • Dysplasia
      • 87.5%
      • What are the 3 types of benign tumours by shape?
      • Papilloma, polyp, and cyst
      • 87.5%
      • What is the naming convention for malignant tumours of epithelial cell origin?
      • Carcinoma
      • 87.5%
      • Are carcinomas or sarcomas more common?
      • Carcinomas
      • 87.5%
      • [...] is an abnormal and uncontrolled clonal proliferation of cells.
      • Neoplasia
      • 87.5%
      • Are cyclin protein levels constant in the cell during the cell cycle?
      • No
      • 81.2%
      • What does anaplastic mean?
      • Poorly differentiated
      • 75.0%
      • The protein family [...] regulates the activity of CDKs during the cell cycle.
      • cyclin
      • 68.8%
      • How do sarcomas first spread through the body?
      • Through veins
      • 68.8%
      • The [...] of a tumour is based on its degree of cellular differentiation based on histological appearance.
      • grade
      • 62.5%
      • What are the 2 classes of proteins involved in regulation of the cell cycle?
      • CDK
        Cyclin
      • 56.2%
      • A [...] is a benign tumour projecting from a mucous membrane.
      • polyp
      • 56.2%
      • A [...] is a benign tumour in a closed sac, with a distinct membrane and division compared to the nearby tissue.
      • cyst
      • 56.2%
      • A [...] is a benign epithelial tumor growing exophytically in finger-like fronds. 
      • papilloma
      • 56.2%
      • What is dysplasia?
      • Change of cellular phenotype which is commonly neoplastic
      • 50.0%
      • What are the 3 reversible -plasias?
      • Hyperplasia
        Metaplasia
        Dysplasia
      • 50.0%
      • Are CDK protein levels constant in the cell during the cell cycle?
      • Yes
      • 43.8%
      • What is the parenchyma of a tumour?
      • The clonal mutant cells
      • 43.8%
      • The [...] of a tumour is based on its degree of localization and spread.
      • stage
      • 43.8%
      • What determines where a tumour metastasizes?
      • Expression of different cell adhesion molecules
      • 43.8%
      • What are the 3 irreversible -plasias?
      • Anaplasia
        Neoplasia
        Desmoplasia
      • 43.8%
      • What are the 3 types of cells in terms of their ability to regenerate? Give an example of each.
      • Labile (skin)
        Stable (liver)
        Permanent (neuron)
      • 37.5%
      • What is desmoplasia?
      • Fibrous tissue formation in response to neoplasm
      • 6.2%